Call for papers | Where are we in the study of war?

Until July 31, 2022 | "Violence: An international journal"

Violence: An international journal is launching a call for papers on the theme "Where are we in the study of war?". This theme section will be coordinated by Michel WIEVIORKA (EHESS) and Scott STRAUS (University of California, Berkeley).

For its general articles’ section, Violence: An international journal is also welcoming papers that deal with issues of violence and exiting violence. Each issue will be coordinated by its two editors-in-Chief: Scott STRAUS (University of California, Berkeley) and Michel WIEVIORKA (EHESS).


Dossier: "Where are we in the study of war?"

Many of the innovations in the literature on war during the past two decades focused on intrastate war. Yet the war in Ukraine powerfully reminds us that interstate war is a feature of our contemporary world. With this special issue, we invite scholars in the social sciences to take stock of the literature on war, to highlight questions and problems, and to open new avenues of inquiry. In this call for papers for Violence: An international journal, we delineate nine possible themes, but the journal remains open to any and all topics related to the study of war.

The concept of war

What is war? Are current analytical categories of war sufficient? How is war different from violence? What is a “special military operation”? What is a “proxy war”? What is a wartime “alliance”? Does the war in Ukraine or other contemporary wars force us to rethink the foundational concepts in this field?

The practice of war

How is war waged? How has the waging of war changed? Some claim that the war in Ukraine has revitalized military practices that had disappeared after World War II. Since the end of the Cold War, many military operations focused on counterterrorism, counterinsurgency, peacebuilding, peacekeeping, and short bursts of asymmetric conflict. The focus has been on operations of a very different nature than what can be observed in Ukraine. Has the art of war changed? What do we know about recruitment and conscription? What about the use of militias and civil defense forces, as Ukraine has done?

The idea of just war

Is the idea of a just war, that dates back to Antiquity and has gone through important developments in Christian thought, applicable to Ukraine’s military action and defensive war? The idea of just war also raises the normative question of responsibility. Who is at fault in a war?

Strategies of war and the role of nuclear power and other technologies

What is the state of strategic thinking on war? What is the place of nuclear weapons in current strategies? How do new technologies, such as drone warfare, robots, and other remote operated machines change strategic thinking? Are there schools of thought, debates, and notable differences depending on which part of the world in which one is? Strategic thinking, after the collapse of the Soviet bloc, developed according to hypotheses other than those of a massive Russian military invasion. Discussions of nuclear weapons seemed stalled, other than around questions of reduction, containment, and even elimination. But Ukraine returns us to the possibility of the deployment of nuclear weapons and even of large-scale nuclear exchange. What is the state of the art of thinking on nuclear weapons? What is the role of tactical nuclear weapons?

War crimes and the question of justice

The question of war crimes has been central to the war in Ukraine. Russian forces appear to have committed atrocities against civilians on a large scale, through bombing civilian areas, executing civilians and former combatants, rape, and other acts. These patterns of violence have given rise to accusations of grave violations of the laws of war, of crimes against humanity, and even of genocide, in addition to the crime of aggression. How does this pattern of violence differ from war crimes in other interstate or intrastate wars? How are these crimes being documented? How are legal actions being prepared? Who will bring a trial? Will it be a domestic trial or an international one? What role will the concept of universal jurisdiction play? What is the prospect for a domestic or international trial? Are developments in international criminal justice during the past 25 years a failure because they seem not to have deterred Russia? Or is there evidence of an impact on the strategic use of violence?

Society, media, and war

War mobilizes societies in different ways. War seems, for instance, to have contributed to the emergence of a Ukrainian national consciousness. We do not know exactly the extent of popular support for Putin, but early evidence suggests that support for Putin remains high. How does war shape public opinion? What is the role of media, especially in our contemporary media environment? How have media influenced public opinion? Does media exacerbate violence or contribute to peace? What is propaganda and how has the use of wartime propaganda changed?

Weapons and the arms industry

War requires weapons. Do we need to update our understanding of contemporary weapons? What is the state of the global arms trade? What is the role of domestic arms industries and military-industrial complexes?

Sanctions

The war in Ukraine witnessed a massive, coordinated international sanctions campaign to deter and punish Russia. But the sanctions also raised questions, such as: do sanctions work? What are the objectives of sanctions? Do sanctions punish populations more than leaders? What are the unintended consequences of sanctions? Are sanctions war by other means? In short, what is the state of the art on sanctions?

Exiting war

How do wars end? What is the state of the art on war termination and war recurrence? Are peace treaties more effective than military victories, or vice versa, for interstate wars? How are negotiated endings established? What do we know in short about exiting war? 

About Violence: An international journal

Today, violence, in all its forms, constitutes a vast field of research in the social sciences.

The same is not true of preventing and exiting violence, which do not have their own well-structured space within the humanities. Much more empirical than theoretical, understanding of these issues is produced more by actors (NGOs, associations), experts, and practitioners than by social science scholars.

Violence: An international journal endeavors to gather together and support a large community of scholars and practitioners, focusing on two complementary yet distinct scientific and intellectual issues: the analysis of violence, in its diverse manifestations, and preventing and exiting violence.

In doing so, Violence: An international journal aims to develop understanding about violence, but also to build up a delineated field of research for preventing and exiting violence, with its contributions and debates.

Each issue opens with a series of general articles, which are be followed by a theme section, composed by articles, debates and interviews. Violence: An international journal also makes a special effort to link together research in the social sciences and other fields of knowledge, forging bonds with literary and artistic circles in particular, with contributions dealing with exiting violence through the lens of art.

Violence: An international journal has the ambition to reach a readership composed of academics, but also a larger audience, including the actors involved in preventing and exiting violence: NGOs, associations, politics, legal experts, and civil society. Articles for Violence: An international journal will nonetheless go through the usual process of academic journals. Once accepted by the editorial board, each article will be sent for peer-review. Changes may then be asked to the author.

The journal is published twice a year in English by Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l’homme and SAGE Publications.

Guidelines

Articles should include a summary, a detailed bibliography and a short biography. Each article should be between 5,000 and 8,000 words in length (including footnotes, bibliography, biography). It should be sent, preferably, in word format and use, systematically, Harvard Reference Style, as follows:

Book
Clark JM and Hockey L (1979) Research for Nursing. Leeds: Dobson Publishers.

Book chapter
Gumley V (1988) Skin cancers. In: Tschudin V and Brown EB (eds) Nursing the Patient with Cancer. London: Hall House, pp.26–52.

Journal article
Huth EJ, King K and Lock S (1988) Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals. British Medical Journal 296(4): 401–405.

Website
Website National Center for Professional Certification (2002) Factors affecting organizational climate and retention. Available at: www.cwla.org./programmes/triechmann/2002fbwfiles (accessed 10 July 2010).

Newspaper / Magazine
Clark JM (2006) Referencing style for journals. The Independent, 21 May, 10.

We ask you to pay particular attention to the quality of your writing style.

To contribute to Violence: An international journal, please send an article, fully written, either for the general articles’ section or for a theme section.

Calendar

Fully written articles for the theme section "Where are we in the study of war?" must be sent before July 31, 2022.

You can send articles for the general articles’ section throughout the year.

Submission of articles

For both the theme "Where are we in the study of war?" and for the general articles’ section, and other sections, please upload your article on the journal’s online platform, hosted by our co-publisher, SAGE Publications: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/violence

If you have any question on the submission process or on the journal, please write to Violence’s managing editor Thomas Coppey : tcoppey@msh-paris.fr

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17 May 2022
Call for paper

Violence: An international journal

Violence, in all its forms, today constitutes a vast field of research in sociology, and in the social sciences. But the same is not true of preventing and exiting violence, which do not have their own well-structured space within the humanities. Much more empirical than theoretical, understanding of these issues is produced more by actors (NGOs, associations), experts, and practitioners than by social science scholars.

Violence: An international journal endeavors to gather together and support a large community of scholars and practitioners, focusing on two complementary yet distinct scientific and intellectual issues: the analysis of violence, in its diverse manifestations, and preventing and exiting violence. In doing so, Violence: An international journal aims to develop understanding about violence, but also to build up a delineated field of research for preventing and exiting violence, with its contributions and debates.

Each issue will be composed of a special feature, as well as other articles, debates and interviews on a wider range of topics. Violence: An international journal will also make a special effort to link together research in the social sciences and other fields of knowledge, forging bonds with literary and artistic circles in particular, with contributions dealing with exiting violence through the lens of art.

Latest issues

Vol. 2 n°2. Violence: An international journal

 

 

 

 

   
Vol. 2 n°1. Violence: An international journal

 

 

 

   
Vol. 1 n°2. Sounds of survival, weaponization of sounds

 

 

 

Vol. 1 n°1. Perpetrating violence

 

 

 

 


Current call for papers:

Past calls for papers:

Please visit the Journal’s submission site to upload your manuscript.
For more information on the submission’s process and the guidelines of the journal, please see here


Violence: An international journal has been created in line with the activities of the Violence and Exiting Violence platform, established in 2015 within the Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme in Paris. The platform brings together some three hundred scholars worldwide, with an international and cross-disciplinary focus.

The journal will be entirely in English and published twice a year by Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l’homme and Sage Publishing.

First issue: June 2020

Founder: Michel Wieviorka

Editors-in-Chief: Scott Straus and Michel Wieviorka.

Editorial Board: Mohamed-Ali Adraoui | Jérôme Ferret | Sabrina Melenotte | Paola Rebughini | Agnès Favier | Sergio Salazar Araya

International Advisory Board:  Bertrand Badie | Fethi Benslama | Catherine Besteman | Judit Bokser Liwerant | Rony Brauman | Craig Calhoun | Manuel Castells | Elisabeth Claverie | Randall Collins | Martha Crenshaw | Carole Damiani | Donatella Della Porta | Mamadou Diouf | Marie-Christine Doran | Jean-Pierre Dozon | Saoud El Mawla | Nilüfer Göle | Maria Stela Grossi Porto | Wilhelm Heitmeyer | Shashi Jayakumar | Mary Kaldor | Farhad Khosrokhavar | Pascale Laborier | Yvon Le Bot | Carlos Martínez-Assad | Tarek Mitri | Ernesto Ottone | Paulo Sérgio Pinheiro | Eduardo Pizarro | Richard Rechtman | Marc Sageman | Jacques Sémelin | Natan Sznaider | Peter Wallensteen | Elisabeth Wood

Managing Editor: Thomas Coppey

Thèmes de recherche : 
Image principale : 
Sous-titre : 

Understanding about violence and building up a delineated field of research for preventing and exiting violence

Périmètres : 
Rubrique (Parent) : 
Resources
Programmes : 
Violence and Exiting Violence Platform
Site Type : 
Imported : 
Focus : 
[Closed] Call for papers | Mediation in the process of exiting political violence
Projet Terminé : 
Type de contenu : 
nouveau contenu
Language : 
en
fr
Type de programme : 
Revue

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